Authors
Alexandros
Carmine
Melanie Abrams
Julius Addlesee
Shelley Aikens
A. Aimee
Jeanne Ainslie
Fredrica Alleyn
Rebecca Ambrose
Diane Anderson-Minshall
Laura Antoniou
Janine Ashbless
Lisette Ashton
Gavin Atlas
Danielle Austen
J. P. Beausejour
P.K. Belden
Tina Bell
Jove Belle
Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
Ronica Black
Candace Blevins
Primula Bond
Lionel Bramble
A. J. Bray
Samantha Brook
Matt Brooks
Zetta Brown
James Buchanan
Louisa Burton
Angela Campion
Angela Caperton
Annabeth Carew
Julia Chambers
Dale Chase
M. Christian
Greta Christina
Valentina Cilescu
Rae Clark
NJ Cole
Christina Crooks
Julius Culdrose
Portia da Costa
Alan Daniels
Angraecus Daniels
Dena De Paulo
Vincent Diamond
Susan DiPlacido
Noelle Douglas-Brown
Hypnotic Dreams
Amanda Earl
Hank Edwards
Jeremy Edwards
Stephen Elliott
Madelynne Ellis
Justine Elyot
Aurelia T. Evans
Lucy Felthouse
Jesse Fox
I. G. Frederick
Simone Freier
Louis Friend
Polly Frost
William Gaius
Bob Genz
Shanna Germain
J. J. Giles
Lesley Gowan
K D Grace
K. D. Grace
Sacchi Green
Ernest Greene
Tamzin Hall
R. E. Hargrave
P. S. Haven
Trebor Healey
Vicki Hendricks
Scott Alexander Hess
Richard Higgins
Julie Hilden
E. M. Hillwood
Amber Hipple
William Holden
Senta Holland
David Holly
Michelle Houston
Debra Hyde
M. E. Hydra
Vina Jackson
Anneke Jacob
Maxim Jakubowski
Kay Jaybee
Ronan Jefferson
Amanda Jilling
SM Johnson
Raven Kaldera
J. P. Kansas
Kevin Killian
D. L. King
Catt Kingsgrave
Kate Kinsey
Geoffrey Knight
Varian Krylov
Vivienne LaFay
Teresa Lamai
Lisa Lane
Randall Lang
James Lear
Amber Lee
Nikko Lee
Tanith Lee
Annabeth Leong
James W. Lewis
Marilyn Jaye Lewis
Ashley Lister
Fiona Locke
Clare London
Scottie Lowe
Simon Lowrie
Catherine Lundoff
Michael T. Luongo
Jay Lygon
Helen E. H. Madden
Nancy Madore
Jodi Malpas
Jeff Mann
Alma Marceau
Sommer Marsden
Gwen Masters
Sean Meriwether
Bridget Midway
I. J. Miller
Madeline Moore
Lucy V. Morgan
Julia Morizawa
David C. Morrow
Walter Mosley
Peggy Munson
Zoe Myonas
Alicia Night Orchid
Craig Odanovich
Cassandra Park
Michael Perkins
Christopher Pierce
Lance Porter
Jack L. Pyke
Devyn Quinn
Cameron Quitain
R. V. Raiment
Shakir Rashaan
Jean Roberta
Paige Roberts
Sam Rosenthal
D. V. Sadero
C Sanchez-Garcia
Lisabet Sarai
R Paul Sardanas
R. Paul Sardanas
Elizabeth Schechter
Erica Scott
Kemble Scott
Mele Shaw
Simon Sheppard
Tom Simple
Talia Skye
Susan St. Aubin
Charlotte Stein
C. Stetson
Chancery Stone
Donna George Storey
Darcy Sweet
Rebecca Symmons
Mitzi Szereto
Cecilia Tan
Lily Temperley
Vinnie Tesla
Claire Thompson
Alexis Trevelyan
Alison Tyler
Gloria Vanderbilt
Vanessa Vaughn
Elissa Wald
Saskia Walker
Kimberly Warner-Cohen
Brian Whitney
Carrie Williams
Peter Wolkoff
T. Martin Woody
Beth Wylde
Daddy X
Lux Zakari
Fiona Zedde
Good Pussy Bad Pussy: Rachel's TaleGood Pussy Bad Pussy: Rachel's Tale
By: A. Aimee
Bedroom Books
ISBN: 1782790845
October 2013





Reviewed By: Sacchi Green

I don’t quite know what to make of Good Pussy Bad Pussy: Rachel’s Tale. I’m not sure the author did, either. The title sounds like a lighthearted, sexy romp, and the first part is certainly sexy enough, but Rachel is foolish rather than lighthearted, and some of the situations she gets herself into are too grim to be considered romps.

This isn’t a bad book by any means. The writing is good on a sentence-by-sentence level, even if the overall pattern is somewhat confusing. The central character is likeable enough, even when one wants to give her a clue-by-four (or six, or eight.) The sex is well written, although by the second half of the book there’s very little enjoyment involved.

Rachel, an American, is bored with her husband in Amsterdam, so she leaves him (and her four year old son) and runs off with blond, buff Stefan to Nice, convincing herself that “it was true love, great passion, high romance.” Life on the Riviera seems to be everything she could want, and so does the sex with Stefan. Sex with Stefan’s boss is even better. But sex with the boss’s brutish business associate is not, and Rachel feels guilty that she comes to orgasm even with someone who repels her. (She never seems to realize how lucky she is that all the men she fucks, even the brute, are skilled at giving women oral sex.)

Rachel also feels guilty now and then about leaving her son, but she’s so intent on living her life to the fullest, on having “freedom” and “being someone” (at least in a sexual context,) that she ignores such guilt as much as she can. She also ignores certain facts of life (as do the men, somewhat unbelievably,) and sure enough, she gets pregnant.

Here’s where the story takes a turn or two away from anything remotely approaching a romp. Stefan rejects her; her husband in Amsterdam reluctantly takes her back, but that isn’t working out well; and suddenly she gets word that her father in New York is dying and she must fly there to be with her family.

What follows is a mix of positive—Rachel’s mother is a strong woman who supports her daughter even while they’re both grieving—and over-the-top negative, chiefly due to Rachel’s  brother-in-law, a gynecologist who has lusted after her for years and now goes batshit crazy over her with assault after assault. I don’t want to give away every detail, but if the pregnancy itself isn’t supposed to be seen as a punishment for all the joyful sex she’s had, the cartoonishishly obssessive brother-in-law certainly fills that bill. After all Rachel’s rhapsodizing over the glories of sex, is she supposed to be learning a lesson?

Then romance reaches out unexpectedly from the past, and the pregnancy may turn out to provide a reward instead of punishment. If this is meant to be a morality tale, Rachel’s one redeeming act has been refusing to get an abortion. 

As I said at the start, I’m not sure what to make of it all. A morality tale or a paean to sexual desire, the greatest life-force? It’s not that I feel a need for every book to be strictly categorized, but in this case I couldn’t help wondering what the reader was supposed to take from all this. Still, every reader is different, so for some, Good Pussy, Bad Pussy may be just what their fantasy lives ordered.